The Elite, The One, The Selection

Inspiration Week! Day 4!

Sorry for the delay on this post, but we’re back today with the final two posts for Inspiration Week. Now that we’ve discussed Aspen at length, it’s time to move on to the other boy who is slowly devouring our souls: Prince Maxon Schreave.

I’m going to be honest, I think one of the reasons I was shocked when so many people immediately abandoned Aspen and favored Maxon was because for me (and America, might I add), Maxon didn’t make sense. Maxon was this distant figure, and for how removed he was from America’s life, he might as well have been fictitious. I mean, I know he is, but like… just work with me here.

These were my earliest impressions of Maxon:

I got distinct feeling of isolation and sadness when I looked at Maxon, though, outwardly, he’s very charming. There is definitely a Maxon for the cameras and a Maxon just for himself. But he’s gotten very good at making sure no one can guess at how desperately he wishes he had more friends, or at least a sibling. If you completely missed how giddy he was when his cousins came to visit, let me remind you: that happened. Even with America upset with him, he was chasing the littlest ones around the garden, soaking up the time before they were gone again.

It’s been different since the girls came. If you’ve read The Prince you know how daunting their arrival was for him, but, when he can get past the actual competition of it, he really enjoys the company. Just the sound of other people in the palace is good for him. And it’s different from guards and butlers who are always around but make a point of never being heard. The Selected girls don’t think like that. They want to be noticed, and that mentality has benefited him.

Anyway, this was the original Maxon, the first impression. And while he looks tall, he’s shorter than Aspen, and while he looks lean, there’s more to him under his suit. I also like the image of him with a gun, off to go hunting. It suits him, as does his photography. You don’t need a partner to do either of those hobbies.

It’s hard to imagine that someone who’s been asked to be an adult since he was a child can grow up anymore, but I think he has. I’m hoping you see special things in him and Aspen and America when you finally get to read The One.